1. How should I prepare myself for the surgical procedure?

2. What is allowed and what is forbidden after tooth extraction?

3. Is it necessary to remove all the wisdom teeth?

4. Is it advisable for teeth to be removed in pregnant women?

5. How long may a wound bleed after a surgical procedure?

6. What is the dry socket?

7. Can a knocked-out tooth be saved?

 

1. How should I prepare myself for the surgical procedure?

To be prepared for the surgical procedure, you should:

  • take a rest;
  • have a light, but calorific meal;
  • take your regular medicines unless the dentist recommends otherwise;
  • relax and trust your dentist!

2. What is allowed and what is forbidden after tooth extraction?

After the tooth extraction procedure:

  • remove the dressing approximately 40 minutes after the procedure;
  • do not eat and drink anything for 2 hours after the procedure;
  • eat only light, semi-liquid food for the whole day after the procedure;
  • do not rinse your mouth;
  • put a cold compress on the face for 2-3 hours after the procedure (recommended);
  • do not warm your face on the side of the extracted tooth;
  • avoiding smoking on the extraction day would be of benefit;
  • in the case of pain you may use any OTC painkiller available, except products containing acetylsalicylic acid, e.g. Aspirin(R).

3. Is it necessary to remove all the wisdom teeth?

If the wisdom teeth are healthy, regularly positioned in the dental arch, do not pose difficulties in cleaning and do not cause pain, there is no need to remove them unless for other reasons, e.g. orthodontic indications. The following are indications for the extraction of wisdom teeth (including impacted ones):

  • uselessness in biting;
  • lack of space in the dental arch;
  • certain diseases of the dental pulp, such as purulent inflammation or gangrene;
  • bone pouch outside the tooth crown;
  • pressure on the neighbouring tooth;
  • cyst around the crown of the impacted tooth (visible on the X-ray);
  • neuralgia caused by the pressure of the tooth on a nerve.

4. Is it advisable for teeth to be removed in pregnant women?

The pregnancy itself is not a contra-indication for tooth extraction. However, the procedure should be appropriately scheduled, the patient should be appropriately prepared and the tooth should be removed quickly and efficiently. The best period for such procedures is the second trimester of the pregnancy. In the first trimester most of the procedures in the oral cavity to be performed are postponed, unless such delay would be a threat for the patient’s health or life. The most important element of the preparation of the patient for such a procedure is calming her and explaining the need for her tooth extraction. Only the most safe and efficient agent may be used for the anaesthesia of pregnant women.

5. How long may a wound bleed after a surgical procedure?

Each surgical procedure is associated with bleeding. The regular bleeding duration varies from several to some dozen minutes (until the clot is formed). An apparently longer bleeding period is considered abnormal, and there may be various underlying general (bleeding tendency, effect of medicines) or local (extra wound, bone injury) causes for such abnormality. Irrespective of the cause of such bleeding, the patient should visit the surgery immediately to seek help.

6. What is the dry socket?

The dry socket is a complication following tooth extraction consisting of the lack of a blood clot in the alveolus (a clot has not been formed or has been washed out), commonly associated with bacterial infection. The symptoms, involving severe sharp pain, radiating to the ears or temples and commonly occurring during the night, as well as general weakness, usually occur 2-3 days after the procedure. Such ailments may persist up to two weeks. The exact cause for such disease is unknown; possible causes include compromised immunity, vitamin deficiencies, smoking, etc. Should similar symptoms occur, the patient should seek help from a dental surgery. The treatment applied will accelerate the wound healing and relieve the pain.

7. Can a knocked-out tooth be saved?

If a tooth has been knocked out, it may be reimplanted, i.e. placed again in its alveolus. The success of such procedure depends of three factors:

  • the stage of development of the tooth; the best chance of successful reimplantation is with young teeth, whose roots have not developed completely;
  • the duration when the tooth was outside the alveolus (preferably not longer than 20-30 minutes);
  • The conditions in which the tooth was kept (it is recommended to keep the tooth in the patient’s mouth or in a container with milk or water.

8. Is the sinus lift procedure painful?

Modern dentistry doesn’t leave room for pain. In our surgery we offer several types of anaesthesia. This allows us to offer full and thorough anaesthesia and therefore all procedures are painless.

9. Are implants placed at the same appointment as the sinus lift procedure?

The decision about implants being fitted immediately or after a certain period is made by the doctor during the procedure planning and depends on several factors, such as bone thickness in the spot of planned implantation.

10. After what time can the treatment be completed after the sinus lift procedure?

Time required for implants to heal-in is the same as with standard implantation in the maxilla, i.e. about 6 months. After this period final crowns can be made and the treatment can be completed. In exceptional cases the period might have to be longer. This depends on patient’s anatomical conditions and the scope of the sinus lift procedure.

11. How often is bone regeneration required?

Statistically 40% of implantological procedures require bone regeneration. Failure to undergo bone regeneration despite indications may cause a deterioration of implant settlement within the bone and a decrease in the implant-bone contact surface.

12. What is dry socket?

Dry socket is a complication of dental extraction, which occurs when a blood clot fails to develop in the tooth socket (the clot failed to develop or has been washed out). It is often accompaniedby a bacterial infection. The symptoms involving severe sharp pain radiating to the ears or temples and commonly occurring during the night, develop 2-3 days after the procedure. Such ailments maypersist for around 2 weeks. The exact cause of the condition is unknown; possible causes include immune system deficiency, vitamin deficiency, smoking etc. If similar symptoms occur, the patient should seek dental help. The applied treatment procedures will accelerate wound healing and relieve pain.